Project Description

Baruch 5:1-9 / Philippians 1:4-6,8-11 /Luke 3:1-

You want to hope for something.

Hope for this.

It’s from one of my favorite pieces of Scripture—
It’s from the prophet Isaiah
as foretells what it will be like when the Messiah returns:

This what we’re waiting for—
We’re waiting for the day when:

The wolf will not be the enemy of lamb—
Instead the lamb will welcome the wolf as a guest.

When the leopard will lie down
with a young goat;

When the calf and the young lion
go around grazing in the field together—
with both calf and young lion
guided by a small child.

Are you visualizing this—
Dreaming—
Hoping.

Hoping for the day
when the cow and the bear eat together.

When the lion doesn’t stalk and
ambush other animals for food—
but instead eats hay just like the ox.

When the little baby plays without fear
by a den of vipers—
And lays his little hand on the adder’s lair.

On that day—
On that day when—
Enemies become friends.
That’s what we wait for—
That’s what we hope for.
And think of that day on the human level.

On that day when bitter family quarrels no longer exist—
When relationships gone bad are healed—
When
And all share at the same table—
in love and joy and peace.

When conservatives and progressives—
When Republicans and Democrats—
When this race and that race—
When this country and that country—
When this religion and that religion—
Embrace—
and walk hand in hand—
together.

Can you see it?

Advent is a time of waiting—
And a time of hoping.

Waiting and hoping for
Jesus to set things right.

But what do we do while we wait?
What do we do?

I really enjoyed watching some of
the coverage of the George H. W. Bush funeral.

I especially enjoyed how he treated
some of the press who just
absolutely crucified him.

Maureen Dowd of The New York Times
admitted that “she didn’t spare the journalistic rod” with Bush.

They disagreed on so many things—
but surprisingly they corresponded
on a pretty regularly basis in the
midst of their political and ideological bantering—
but in a friendly and funny way.

“Put it this way,’’ Bush wrote Dowd,
“I reserve the right to whine,
to not read,
to use profanity,
but if you ever get really hurt or
if you ever get really down and
need a shoulder to cry on or
just need a friend —
give me a call.
I’ll be there for you.
I’ll not let you down.

Now, go on out and knock my knickers off.
When you do,
I might just cancel my subscription.”

This is what Bush wrote to Dowd when her mother died—
She said his note made her cry.

“It hurts to lose a parent,’’ Bush wrote.

. . . .“I hope your . . . Mom had a peaceful passing;
and that she felt joyous about going on to heaven.
Heck with politics.
Heck with the NYT and all my hang ups about it.”

What do we do while we wait for Jesus to come again?
What do we do?

This was some advice that Bush 41
had for young people.

He wrote this in a letter to a friend. (former IBM CEO Sam Palmisano)

“My advice to young people might be as follows:

Don’t get down when your life takes a bad turn.
Out of adversity comes challenge and often success

Don’t blame others for your setbacks

When things go well, always give credit to others

Don’t talk all the time.
Listen to your friends and mentors and learn from them
Don’t brag about yourself.
Let others point out your virtues, your strong points.

Give someone else a hand.
When a friend is hurting show that friend you care

Nobody likes an overbearing big shot.

As you succeed, be kind to people.
Thank those who help you along the way

Don’t be afraid to shed a tear when your
heart is broken because a friend is hurting.

Say your prayers!!”

What do we do while we wait for Jesus to come again?
What do we do to as the Baptist said,
“prepare the way for the Lord”?

I’m in a Bible study with a group of
men that meets every week.

At this last week’s meeting
we talked about Advent and
what we were going to do
to prepare for the coming of Jesus.

One guy started talking about all the goals
he had set for his life—
and many of them he accomplished—
he’s very successful in his field.

But as we talked about
preparing for the coming of Jesus,
he said,
“Now, when I get up in the morning
I’m going to set as my major goal of the day,
to help as many people as I can.”

What do we do while we wait for Jesus to come again?
What do we say as a voice crying out in the desert?

Friday was a very rough day for us here at the parish.

I was on my way to Covington for a wedding
when I got a call that our
processional Cross was missing.

We found the staff in the back—
the crucifix had been broken off for who knows what—

Why would somebody do such a thing?
Money?
Sacrilege?

I don’t know.

Who would do such a thing?

I don’t know.

You can imagine the emotions—
anger and sadness primarily.

“How do you respond?” I asked myself.

Well, I know.
And you know too,

It’s all in the Book—
It’s in the Gospel—
That’s where Bush got his stuff—
It’s written in the law book of God’s Kingdom.

And after we have helped
prepare the way of the Lord—

After we have made straight his path—
and helped fill the valleys—
and made low the hills—

After we have helped make the winding road straight—
and the rough ways smooth—
We shall—
We shall see the salvation of God.

And on that day:

The wolf will not be the enemy of lamb—
instead the lamb will welcome the wolf as a guest.

When the leopard will lie down
with a young goat;

When the calf and the young lion
go around grazing in the field together—
with both calf and young lion
guided by a small child.

Are you visualizing this—
Dreaming—
Hoping.

Hoping for the day
when the cow and the bear eat together.

When the lion doesn’t stalk and
ambush for food—
but eats hay just like the ox.

When the little baby plays without fear
by a den of vipers—
And lays his little hand on the adder’s lair.

On that day—
On that day when—
Enemies become friends.

Come Lord Jesus, Come

Holy Spirit 12/8-9/2018